VIRTUAL Lecture Series: Korean Religion & Culture

 Monday, August 3, 2020 - Wednesday, August 5  
Virtual: Zoom

These 90-minute virtual lectures are held at 10:30 a.m. Monday-Thursday through Zoom, an online conferencing service.

Korean Religion & Culture (Aug. 3 & 4)
Merose Hwang, PhD, Associate Professor of History at Hiram College, speaks on historic and current aspects of religion in Korea, especially shamanism, and its impact on the culture of Korea.

Join by Zoom

To attend, you'll need a computer or mobile device, such as an iPad or smart phone to see each other through video. If you have a non-smartphone, you're still able to join by calling in and listening. Please note: you do not have to join by video to participate.

Monday, Aug. 3

10:30 a.m. What is Korea?

This lecture with Merose Hwang, PhD, explores that question by examining Korean culture, focusing on the geopolitics, folk belief systems, familial traditions, gendered practices and traditions. Hwang will analyze the history of Korea looking at state ideologies and governing systems (paying special attention to the last 150 years).

Hwang is an Associate Professor of History, the Coordinator for the Asian Studies Minor and the Peace Corps Preparatory Programs at Hiram College.

She has held positions as a research fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies, Yonsei University and as a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, in Seoul, South Korea. Hwang has received grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Kathryn W. Davis Fellowship for Peace, Korea Foundation, Connaught Fellowship, Samsung Fellowship, the Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies and the Mellon Directed Research in the Humanities Research. She received her PhD from the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto in Canada.

View Recorded Lecture

Tuesday, Aug. 4

10:30 a.m., Korean Religious Practices

This second and last lecture in the series on Korea will examine the founding religious principles of Shamanism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Christianity and New Religions and how they continue to co-exist in Korea. Through an in-depth study of Korean shamanic practices, we will see an example of how religions compete, co-exist and persevere.

Merose Hwang, PhD, is an Associate Professor of History, the Coordinator for the Asian Studies Minor and the Peace Corps Preparatory Programs at Hiram College.

She has held positions as a research fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies, Yonsei University and as a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, in Seoul, South Korea. Hwang has received grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Kathryn W. Davis Fellowship for Peace, Korea Foundation, Connaught Fellowship, Samsung Fellowship, the Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies and the Mellon Directed Research in the Humanities Research. She received her PhD from the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto in Canada.

View Recorded Lecture
Wednesday, Aug. 5
10:30 a.m., Understanding North Korea through it’s Modern History

North Koreans are very proud of their history, though the rest of the world may not know why.

In this lecture, Merose Hwang,PhD, argues that one way to better understand North Koreans is to learn their history from their point of view to glimpse their notions of selfhood. This approach will also show how Americans are connected to North Korea through their historical engagement in the Asia-Pacific region.

This presentation will consider four watershed moments from a North Korean historiographical perspective: the Sino-Japanese War (1894), Japanese colonialism (1910), the Korean War (1948) and the Cold War (1960s-).

Hwang is an Associate Professor of History, the Coordinator for the Asian Studies Minor and the Peace Corps Preparatory Programs at Hiram College.

She has held positions as a research fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies, Yonsei University and as a visiting scholar at the Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, in Seoul, South Korea. Hwang has received grants and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Kathryn W. Davis Fellowship for Peace, Korea Foundation, Connaught Fellowship, Samsung Fellowship, the Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies and the Mellon Directed Research in the Humanities Research. She received her PhD from the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto in Canada.

View Recorded Lecture

Supplemental Materials

In this virtual tour provided by HistoryView, visit the special exhibition “Tigers in East Asian Art: Korea, Japan, China” that was in the National Museum of Korea in 2018. The exhibition was inspired by Soohorang, the white tiger mascot of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang.

The National Museum of Korea is a place that people can explore and appreciate Korean history and culture through programs, cultural events and permanent exhibitions. This museum attracts over a million visitors each year, making it one of the most visited museums in Asia.

View Virtual Tour

Created by Google Arts and Culture, view an exhibit of Korean heritage. This exhibition explores the various aspects of Korean history from the influence of dynasties to the impact of Korea’s culture today.

View Exhibit
August 2020
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